Published: Tue, September 05, 2017
World Media | By Shelia Harmon

Tropical Storm Jose Becomes the 10th Named Storm of the Hurricane Season

Tropical Storm Jose Becomes the 10th Named Storm of the Hurricane Season

Tropical Storm Jose has formed in the open Atlantic, making it the 10th tropical storm of the 2017 Atlantic hurricane season.

The eye of Hurricane Irma was located near latitude 16.8 North, longitude 58.4 West, 225 miles east of Antigua and about 230 miles east-southeast of Barbuda.

In Florida, we always prepare for the worst and hope for the best and while the exact path of Irma is not absolutely known at this time, we can not afford to not be prepared.

Jose is moving west-northwest at about 13 miles per hour and is expected to speed up in the next two days.

By this weekend, Jose is then expected to slow down and turn northwest. The latest minimum central pressure reported by reconnaissance aircraft is 931 mb. Four to 8 inches of rain is possible within the path of Irma, with localized amounts of 12 inches.

Tropical Storm Jose looms right behind Hurricane Irma
Tropical Storm Jose Becomes the 10th Named Storm of the Hurricane Season

Irma is on a path that could take it over the northern Leeward Islands by tonight or early Wednesday.

There remains a large spread in the models of where this storm could be past day five, which makes a significant difference in the forecast.

The increase to 175 miles per hour winds makes Irma the strongest hurricane in the Atlantic since Hurricane Felix in 2007, according to Colorado State University researcher Phil Klotzbach. Any land impacts were still unknown this early out.

The peak of the Atlantic hurricane season is September 10.

A tropical storm warning is in effect for Guadeloupe and Dominica, as well as the Dominican Republic from south of Cabo Engao to Isla Saona and for Haiti from south of Le Mole St. Nicholas to Port-Au-Prince.

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