Published: Wed, January 17, 2018
Medicine | By Rogelio Lindsey

Iowa, 20 other states sue FCC over net neutrality

Iowa, 20 other states sue FCC over net neutrality

With only one Republican (Senator Susan Collins) now saying she'll vote for the measure, the effort needs just one more Republican vote to pass in the Senate.

"Democrats will force vote on the legislation later this year", the party said in the announcement.

"An attempt to reverse the FCC's repeal of popular net neutrality rules now has the support of at least 50 Senators, according to the https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-switch/wp/2018/01/15/the-senates-push-to-overrule-the-fcc-on-net-neutrality-now-has-50-votes-democrats- say/?utm_term=.13b20544547c" Washington Post.

To win passage of the resolution, its supporters must recruit one more Republican member to their ranks.

Net neutrality proponents' rage towards the regulation's repeal has reached unsafe new heights; FCC chairman Ajit Pai canceled his appearance at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in January reportedly due to death threats. President Donald Trump would also need to sign the resolution into law. If the resolution passes during this window, it will overturn the FCC's 3-2 decision and prohibit the agency from passing similar measures in the future.

As of Friday, California, Washington, New York, Rhode Island, Nebraska and MA had introduced net neutrality, with North Carolina and IL considering similar legislation. Ed Markey (D-Mass.) and 15 other senators said they planned to use the CRA to undo the FCC's vote.

Are you hoping that the net neutrality repeal will be stopped? "I think [Democrats] see it as a really hot political issue [that] gets their base kind of energized". It was the biggest win for FCC Chairman Ajit Pai in his sweeping effort to undo many telecommunications regulations. Now the Democrats are fighting hard to save net neutrality, but they will need a little help from their rivals to do so. Critics of that move say net neutrality rules are necessary to prevent carriers from discriminating against competitors and small companies that can't afford high fees for fast-lane service. "No voter-whether Republican, Democrat or Independent-is happy about the prospect of monopolistic telecoms controlling what they can access online".

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