Published: Fri, November 23, 2018
World Media | By Shelia Harmon

Up to 85 000 children 'dead of starvation or disease in Yemen'

Up to 85 000 children 'dead of starvation or disease in Yemen'

In September, a previous round of UN-led peace talks faltered when the Huthis refused to travel to Geneva, accusing the world body of failing to guarantee their delegation's return to Sanaa or secure the evacuation of wounded rebels to Oman.

The Houthis have said repeatedly that they need stronger security guarantees from the global community that they will be given safe passage through the crippling air and sea blockade the coalition has enforced since March 2015.

Last week, the Saudi-led coalition ceased a five-month offensive to retake control of the Yemeni port-city of Hodeidah.r Over the weekend, however, fighting flared up again between the two sides.

The renewed fighting undermines the latest United Nations efforts to end the three-year war.

On Monday, Britain presented to the UN Security Council a draft resolution urging an immediate truce in Hodeida, whose port serves as an entry point to almost all imports and humanitarian aid to the impoverished country.

On Monday, Britain presented to the UN Security Council a draft resolution urging an immediate truce in Hodeida and setting a two-week deadline for the warring sides to remove all barriers to humanitarian aid.

It also calls for an unhindered flow of commercial and humanitarian goods, and a large, fast injection of foreign currency into the economy through the central bank. No date has been set yet.

This vital entry point for United Nations and other humanitarian aid is also the centre of the conflict between the US-backed Saudi-led coalition and the Iranian-aligned Houthis.

He further warned that an estimated 150,000 children's lives were endangered in Hudaydah with "a dramatic increase" in air strikes over the city in recent weeks.

Both parties in the conflict stand accused of acts that could amount to war crimes.

A year later, the coalition intervened as President Abedrabbo Mansour Hadi fled into Saudi exile.

As many as 85,000 infants under the age of five may have died from starvation or disease since 2015 in war-ravaged Yemen, humanitarian organisation Save the Children said Wednesday. Aid workers in Yemen say many go unreported because only half of the country's health facilities are functioning and many people are too poor to access the ones that remain open.

The fallout from the killing of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi at the kingdom's Istanbul consulate has drawn renewed attention to the war and devastation in Yemen.

The renewed violence follows progress toward ending Yemen's war of almost four years, a conflict that has killed at least 10,000 people and has pushed the nation to the brink of the world's worst famine in 100 years, leaving 14 million people at risk of starvation, according to the United Nations.

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